© 2012-19 by EDWARD TIMKE

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Photojournalism: Representing the World through Magazines

Instructor of Record, University of Michigan

Communication Studies 488

Spring 2012

 

Description

This hands-on seminar explores the history, evolution, and legacy of photojournalistic magazines in the United States from the 19th century to present with an extended look at notable magazines from the late 20th century. The course also surveys theories and techniques of visual and textual analysis in order for students to hone their skills in critically reading, analyzing, and situating the interplay between texts and images and how chosen photojournalistic styles represent, shape, and map a certain window onto the world. Students have the opportunity to apply these tools through discussion, film screenings, in-class workshops and writing, two exams, and a capstone project and presentation.

Major Responsibilities

Complete design of course readings, assignments, and exams.



Developed lectures, seminar activities and workshops, handouts, grading rubrics, and exam review sessions.

Marked students' attendance, participation, written assignments, and exams.

Held weekly office hours to advise students.
 

Course Details
Four credit course meeting 6 hours per week for 7 weeks.
 

Upper-level undergraduate elective.
 

Total Students: 19



Sample Student Evaluations

Description

Taught French high school students on American history and society.  Participated in faculty meetings to assess English language courses.  Initiated “pen pal” program between 30 American and French high school students.

Assistant d'anglais (English Language Assistant)

Lycée Technique d'Alembert, Académie de Lyon (Saint-Étienne, France)

French Ministry of Education and the Fulbright Commission

2003-04 Academic Year

Description

Provide users of all academic levels and specialties with writing and brainstorming advice, focusing on higher-order writing issues, including thesis development, argument building, and organization.

e-Structor, Online Writing Lab Tutor

Pearson Education, Inc. / Smarthinking, Inc.

September 2007-Present

Description

Research sponsor for three first-year undergraduate students on a research project entitled, "Constructing the French Woman in the US and the American Woman in France." Led weekly meetings with students on how to conduct historical archival research. Provided feedback to students on their assigned summaries of theoretical and histiographical literature. Oversaw students' individual archival projects involving magazines, television, and films from the 1940s-1960s, which culminated in their creation of a project abstract and poster presentation. Advised students on research as well as academic and extracurricular opportunities on and off campus.



Awarded Certificate of Recognition as Nominee for Outstanding UROP Research Mentor of the Year Award.

Undergraduate Research Sponsor and Mentor

Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program, University of Michigan

2011-12 Academic Year

Major Responsibilities

Reviewed students' final research paper drafts (roughly 12-15 pages) and provided comments and suggestions for final drafts.
 

Assisted in design of grading rubric.



Course Details

Upper-level undergraduate elective.

 

Total Students: 20

Seminar in Media and Culture, Music, and Identity

Grader, University of Michigan

Communication Studies 479

Winter 2011

Major Responsibilities

Design of two weekly one-hour discussion sections.

Developed section activities, study handouts, memoes on best practices in writing, and writing workshop materials. Sample Study Handouts

Assisted development of exams and grading rubrics.

Marked students' attendance, participation, exams/quiz, group work, and written assignments (weekly group responses, 2-page short paper, 3-5 page issue paper, 8-10 page final portfolio paper).

Guest lectured on adaptative strategies for a globalized music industry.

Held weekly office hours to advise students.

Course Details

Four credit course meeting 4 hours per week (3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion) for 15 weeks.

Upper-level undergraduate major requirement elective.
 

Meets the University of Michigan's Upper-Level Writing Requirement.
 

Total Students: 39 (two sections)



Sample Student Evaluations

Course description by Amanda Lotz, Instructor of Record

Understanding Media Industries guides students through an introductory exploration of the complex and rapidly evolving media industries in the U.S. The course examines the influence of media industry organization and practices on society at the same time that it offers students pursuing both scholarly and professional careers related to the media industries a comprehensive overview of how the industries work, why they work as they do, and the broader theoretical and practical implications of the media industries. Questions such as "why is media industry organization important?" "how do we make sense of media industry changes?" and "what are the key issues facing media industries?" animate our analysis. Here we understand the business of media as a component of its status as culture. Students should leave the course with expanded knowledge of the inner-workings of the media industries to which they will subscribe and consume from throughout their lives.

Understanding Media Industries

Graduate Student Instructor, University of Michigan

Communication Studies 351

Winter 2011

Major Responsibilities

Complete design of two weekly one-hour discussion sections.

 

Developed section activities, study handouts, memoes on best practices in writing, grading rubrics, and exam review sessions.

 

Marked students' attendance, participation, and written assignments (6-page paper, blue book midterm exam, 10-page draft of final research paper, 12-14 page final research paper, and blue book final exam).

 

Held weekly office hours to advise students.

 

Course Details
Four credit course meeting 4 hours per week (3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion) for 15 weeks.
 

Upper-level undergraduate major requirement elective.
 

Meets the University of Michigan's Upper-Level Writing Requirement.
 

Total Students: 38 (Fall 2011, two sections); 39 (Fall 2010, two sections)

 

Sample Student Evaluations 

Course description by Derek Valliant, Instructor of Record

This course explores the ascent of commercial media culture in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present and its consequences for contemporary society. It uses an historical approach to trace the development of modern communication forms and technologies and their dynamic relationship to social, cultural, and political struggle and change. We will reflect on the causes and effects of changes over time in media forms, institutions, and communication processes. We will also examine how media representations contribute to processes of social and cultural identity formation (e.g., class, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexuality). The goals of the course are to further your understanding of the interdependent domains of media, culture, and society using history as a guide; to analyze and critique links between social, cultural, and political power and media representations; and to develop greater appreciation of the complex relationship between media and everyday life.

Media, Culture, and Society



Graduate Student Instructor, University of Michigan

Communication Studies 371

Fall 2011, Fall 2010

Major Responsibilities

Complete design of two weekly one-hour discussion sections.



Developed section activities, study handouts, grading rubrics, and exam review sessions.

Marked students' attendance, participation, applied midterm essay exam, weekly blog postings and responses, and annotated bibliography projects.

Guest lecture on the translation, globalization, and co-production of music.
 

Held weekly office hours to advise students.

Course Details
Four credit course meeting 4 hours per week (3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion) for 15 weeks.
 

Upper-level undergraduate elective.
 

Total Students: 34 (two sections)



Sample Student Evaluations

Description by Aswin Punathambekar, Instructor of Record

This course offers students a framework for exploring the media's role in processes of globalization and how the globalization of media shapes the socio-cultural, political, economic, ethical and moral dimensions of our lives in this world.

Under the impact of new technological advances and transnational flows of people, culture, and capital, media artifacts routinely move across national borders with audiences playing an increasingly participatory role. While paying close attention to audiences and the relationship between media circulation, geography and cultural identities, we will also focus on the ways in which contemporary media industries are grappling with the challenges and opportunities of globalization. Within these broad frameworks, topics explored will include: media and modernity, globalization and hybridity, gender and sexuality, diasporic media, media convergence and participatory culture, piracy, and governance of global media systems.

Discussion sections and assignments for the course are designed to emphasize both theoretical and creative work. This course will provide students with opportunities to curate and create media and in the process, acquire important skills in collaborative work.​

Media and Globalization



Graduate Student Instructor, University of Michigan Communication Studies 488
Winter 2012

EDWARD TIMKE, PhD

Instructor, Cultural Anthropology

Associate Editor, Advertising & Society Quarterly

Duke University